PROMENADE- GERMANTOWN TEXTILE HISTORY MUSEUM

  • WHY "PROMENADE"?
    Promenade, according to Latin origin, means a stroll or walk, especially in a public place, as for pleasure or display. This term fits the function of a museum, as guests enjoy themselves, strolling through exhibits, viewing their displays. 
     
    The tapestries that are used throughout the museum are highly prominent, so the closeness of the terms "promenade" and "prominent" in spelling and phonetics, depending on the pronounciation, also led to naming the museum "Promenade". 
     
    CONCEPT:
    Influenced by the rhythm of quilt patches a variety of modules will be interwoven chronologically to represent the narratives of those from Germantown’s historic textile industry
     
    MISSION:
    Inform the community of Manayunk of the key events of the textile industry and narratives of its contributors, Joseph Ripka, the children, and Charles McDowell. 
     
    WAYFINDING STATEMENT:
    Wayfinding encompasses all the ways in which people orient themselves in a space and navigate them from place to place. For Promenade, movement in the exterior begins with a curved curtain wall guiding visitors to the museum's vestibule. From the vestibule to the directly opposed ticketing office, tapestries hang at different heights in a two story high space. The tapestries' orientation guide guests through the museum. Parallel to the exhibits are tapestries with colors corresponding to the respective exhibit it is parallel to. From various standpoints throughout the museum, navigation is provided for guests. Along with the tapestries there is signage to accomodate the disabled. 
     
    GALLERY NARRATIVES: 
    JOSEPH RIPKA GALLERY (MAIN GALLERY):
    Joseph Ripka’s story proves to be one of the most unique because of its family business dynamic over its corporation dynamic which was popular during its time. English, Protestant Irish, and German immigrants would arrive in Manayunk with textile industry experience and work there, advancing in their field. As they advanced, their children would follow suit in the industry and master the trade. 
    CHILD LABOR STORY GALLERY (MEDIUM GALLERY):
    Children spent their days as laborers in the late nineteenth century. While technology improved the working conditions of the laborers remained constant. The exhibit encompasses the story of the children from 1849 to 1913. Their covered story covers the beginning of child labor regulation to complete abolishment in the Manayunk mills.
    CHARLES MCDOWELL GALLERY (INTIMATE GALLERIES):
    From 1828 to 1864, McDowell Paper Mill, present location of Connelly Container Corporation, produced paper and spun cotton. In 1864, the mill was handed to William H. Harding, the owner of Philadelphia Inquirer. With the explosion of paper manufacturing, various paper manufacturers occupied the mill. One of these manufacturers include Charles McDowell.   
     
    HUMAN BEHAVIOR NOTES:
    -the tiers that constitute the galleries create an immersive experience for the guests.
    -Barriers between the public and the facility management create privacy for the employees and mystery for the guests. 
    -The green roof outside the cafe is sustainable and provides guests with a serene environment.
  • SECOND FLOOR
  • FIRST FLOOR WITH SITE
  • BASEMENT FLOOR
  • FIRST FLOOR REFLECTED CEILING PLAN
  • LONGITUDINAL SECTION
  • SHORT SECTION
  • JOSEPH RIPKA GALLERY ENTRANCE
  • CHILD LABOR GALLERY
  • CHARLES McDOWELL GALLERY
  • MUSEUM CAFE
  • CHARLES McDOWELL GALLERY ENTRANCE ELEVATION
  • WAYFINDING PLAN
  • WAYFINDING SIGNAGE
  • CUSTOM DISPLAY SYSTEM DETAIL
  • CUSTOM DISPLAY SYSTEM DETAIL
  • CUSTOM DISPLAY SYSTEM DETAIL
  • CUSTOM RECEPTION DESK DETAIL
  • CUSTOM RECEPTION DESK DETAIL
  • CUSTOM RECEPTION DESK DETAIL
  • SPIRAL STAIRCASE DETAIL
  • SPIRAL STAIRCASE DETAIL
  • SPIRAL STAIRCASE DETAIL
  • SPIRAL STAIRCASE DETAIL